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Professional Development Webinars for Educators in March from CTL

Professional Development Webinars for Educators in March from CTL

Stephanie Shea

Stephanie Shea

Marketing Manager at CTL
Stephanie Shea holds a BA in Journalism from the University of Georgia and has almost 20 years of writing experience ranging from newspaper reporting to PR, blogging, website copy, product descriptions, social media and advertising. When she’s not at CTL, Stephanie can be found playing the tenor sax, practicing astrology or hitting the running trails in Forest Park.
Stephanie Shea

Join CTL for two Professional Development Webinars for Educators in March – No Cost to Attend!

As part of our commitment to Education, CTL is offering free Professional Development webinars for our Education Customers. These webinars will include a variety of topics relevant to K-12 EdTech but will have a big focus on Google Apps for Edcuation and Chromebooks in the Classroom. Here is the listing of our March webinars. To see scheduled webinars for April and beyond, please visit http://ctl.info/webinars/. You can also access recordings of all our previous webinars on this site.

YouTube Authoring Tips and Tricks

Thu, Mar 16, 2017 9:00AM – 10:00AM PST– In this hourlong webinar, Katherine Livick of ESD 112 will demonstrate how to use YouTube’s Creator Studio, effects you can apply to your videos, captioning, and more!

  • Creating a YouTube Channel
  • Using the Creator Studio
  • Video Effects
  • Keywording
  • Captioning
  • Q & A session
Wednesday, March 29, 2017 11:00 AM – 12:00PM PST
 

Have you configured your G Suite Admin Console with educational best practices in mind? Guest presenter Peter Henrie, authorized Google Education Trainer and co-founder of Amplified IT, an education-focused Google for Education Consultancy, will cover key best practice settings and approaches to G Suite Domain management. Learn the importance of conducting an in-depth review of your G Suite domain  in the following key areas:

  • Operations & Management
  • Services & Configuration
  • Security & Compliance
  • Adoption & Usage

The presentation will be followed by a Q & A session.

 

 

Google Chrome Time Saving Tips for Educators

Google Chrome Time Saving Tips for Educators

Dani Kennis

Dani Kennis

Dani is a high school Special Education Social Studies teacher and Technology Coach in the New York suburbs. She is also a Level 2 Google Certified Trainer and co-founder of The Education Calendar, a crowdsourced map and calendar of education events worldwide. Her blended classroom incorporates the use of G Suite (formerly Google Apps for Education) as well as other Web 2.0 tools in order to prepare her students to be successful 21st century learners in a global community. She blogs about her work and teaching at DaniKennis.com and would love to connect on Twitter (@kennisdani).
Dani Kennis

Get More Done in Less Time with Google Chrome!

By Dani Kennis (danikennis.com or @kennisdani on Twitter)

In today’s fast-paced society, we strive to complete tasks as quickly and efficiently as possible. For many educators, Google Chrome and G Suite (formerly Google Apps for Education) helps us get more done in less time. To ‘level up’ your knowledge of Google Chrome, continue reading for tips and tricks for working faster and smarter while using your favorite web browser. For the full rundown of tips and tricks, tune into CTL’s Webinar series on Tuesday, November 29 from 4-5pm EST (1-2pm PST). Click here to register.

  1. Always be sure to sign into Google Chrome. Whether you are at school, home, or on the go, logging into the Google Chrome browser enhances the user experience. Automatically, users are logged into apps such as Gmail and other Google services, as well as YouTube. All browsing data, history, bookmarks, passwords and other user settings are automatically saved and synced to user’s Google accounts. This is one of the very first skills I teach my students at the beginning of the year as we dive into the 1:1 experience.
  2. While we’re talking organization, Google Keep is an invaluable tool for the Chrome user. It is a note taking and organization platform that is connected to the Google ecosystem. Think of it as a virtual combination of Post-ItsⓇ and “to-do” lists. The colorful yet minimalist look of Keep makes it easy to organize and share text, images, voice notes, and reminders on the go. Users can even set alert times for reminders. If you are looking for a similar app with additional functionality, Evernote is a great alternative to Google Keep.
  3. Extensions, extensions, extensions! Google Chrome Extensions offer users enhanced functionality at no cost. Who doesn’t love efficiency for free? Two of my favorite extensions are Google Mail Checker and OneTab. Mail Checker allows users to be signed into multiple Gmail accounts at the same time and provides alerts when a new email comes into a user’s inbox without the user having to open up Gmail – Definitely a huge time saver for those of us with multiple personal accounts or work e-mail addresses. By clicking the extension icon, you can preview or read emails right from the Extensions bar rather than going directly into Gmail. OneTab is my all time favorite app for those of us that constantly have more tabs open in our browser than we know what to do with. OneTab compiles all open tabs into a list of links in just one tab, helping users to save battery power and keep all tabs in one tidy place. To download these apps and more visit the Google Chrome Web Store,
  4. Keyboard shortcuts. Saving time by reducing keystrokes is my personal favorite way to increase efficiency. There are an endless amount of keyboard shortcuts and they vary depending on advice. Below are a few of my most frequently used and favorited keyboard shortcuts that simplify my Chrome experience.  
  • Ctrl + C = Copy
  • Ctrl + V = Paste
  • Ctrl + A = Select all text
  • Ctrl + K = Insert link
  • Ctrl + T = Open new tab
  • Ctrl + click = Opens a link in a new tab
  • Ctrl + = Zoom in
  • Ctrl – = Zoom out
  • Ctrl + shift + M = Log in with a new user or an incognito tab.

Depending on the G Suite app you are using, there are many other shortcuts available to users. When I am kicking off the school year with an intro to 1:1 etiquette, I provide my students with a checklist of skills, including keyboard shortcuts, they should know to make their lives that much easier.

  1. The power of the Omnibox. The Omnibox is the bar located at the very top of a website that contains the web address – but it is so much more than just a URL home. It can be used as a search engine without having to type in Google.com, or users can right click and visit the ‘Edit search engines’ option to search websites like YouTube, Wikipedia, CNN, or almost any website with a variety of search options. The Omnibox can also be used to search Gmail inboxes by typing ‘search Gmail:” to locate a specific email. For a complete list of Omnibar options, this website is a great resource for the superuser and for those really looking to ‘power up,’ this site explains how Extensions can be used to further enhance the Omnibox capability and functionality.

Time is a scarce commodity that we value and cherish, especially as teachers with only a few precious minutes in between periods, during prep time, or after school. Knowing how to utilize our favorite and most used tools, such as Google Chrome, can enable us to work smarter, not harder. For even more tips and tricks of saving time and being an efficient Google Chrome user, tune into my webinar on Tuesday, November 29th.

 

Google Forms for Educators: Save Time and Work More Efficiently

Google Forms for Educators: Save Time and Work More Efficiently

Katherine Livick

Katherine Livick

Professional Development Manager for Digital Learning at ESD 112 at ESD 112
Katherine is the Professional Development Manager for Digital Learning at ESD 112. She is a Google Certified Administrator and manages ESD 112’s GAFE training domain. She’s also a Google Education Trainer who trains district personnel on best practices for managing and using Google apps in an educational setting, as well as providing general tech integration training.
Katherine Livick

Latest posts by Katherine Livick (see all)

Google Forms for Educators: Your Secret Weapon

Join CTL and Katherine Livick of ESD 112 on Wednesday, October 19 at 9am PDT for a Google Forms for Educators webinar. REGISTER HERE: http://ctl.li/Google-Forms-Education

All of us are pressed for time, but nobody is more squeezed than teachers, secretaries, and administrators! Anyone who works in a school setting could benefit from a secret weapon that helps them collect information, assess students, and organize data into its most useful form. Google Forms is that secret weapon–and it’s already included in G Suite for Education (your Google Apps toolbox that also contains Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides).

Google Forms for EducatorsWhat’s Forms?
If you’ve ever used SurveyMonkey or filled out an online form, you might have an idea of what Google Forms looks like. It’s an online survey and assessment tool with myriad possibilities for use in the classroom, office or home. You can find Forms under the NEW button in your Google Drive (hover over “More” and you’ll see it in the pop-out,) or visit the Forms homepage by finding it in your App Launcher (the “waffle” at top right of any Google page) when you’re logged into Google services.

What can I do with Forms?
Forms is a powerful tool for any sort of  information collection. You can gather data from parents, students, and colleagues for almost any purpose:

 

  • Feedback and reflection forms
  • Parent night
  • Behavioral data
  • Entry and exit tasks
  • Book, Chromebook, iPad, other equipment check-out (for staff or students)
  • Observation forms (for staff observing students, admin observing teachers, teachers observing peers, etc.)
  • Worksheets
  • Appointment sign-ups (parent conferences, individual student conferencing, etc.)
  • Create quizzes and tests (even self-grading ones!)
  • Streamline your workflow by “form-ifying” your data entry tasks

Forms Basics
When you create a new form, you can customize almost every aspect to meet your needs. Change the title and name of the form, include brief directions in the “form description” field, and start creating questions. You can create multiple choice, checkbox, dropdown, short or extended paragraph, linear scale, or multiple choice grid questions.  You can also request a date or time response from your recipients.

Add a collaborator if you have a partner you wish to have edit the form or view the response data. Select a color theme or images to suit your form, then choose your form’s privacy and response collection settings. Preview your form to see how it looks to recipients, then share your form via Drive, email, or embedding a link. The form is automatically saved in your Google Drive, so you can go back to view or edit it with ease. Once you have some responses, you can view them right in your form, or have Forms automatically create a spreadsheet for you in Google Sheets so you can view and manipulate the data more carefully.

Getting Fancy
If you’ve mastered basic Forms creation and want to do more, there are many add-ons for both Forms and Sheets that can help you take things to the next level. Have forms export data to PDFs or Google Docs, eliminate choices as they’re selected by respondents, add math equations, set up email notifications, create bubble sheets for paper testing from a form, and more. You can even write and run your own custom scripts to really personalize the experience. Within the original Forms tool are dozens of settings to help you create adaptive tests or self-grading quizzes. “Borrow” and adapt forms by making a copy from a colleague or from the template gallery (just click “More” at the top right of the ribbon of example forms). You can even view or create forms on a mobile device. The possibilities are endless once you dive in!

Cool Ideas
Thousands of teachers and school personnel are using Google Forms around the world–and they’re sharing their ideas! Check out FollowMolly’s ideas for using Forms. Ditch That Textbook has some simple and practical examples and templates. Cult of Pedagogy includes Forms in its list of essential Google Apps student project ideas. A simple search for “Google Forms classroom ideas” will turn up many more sources of inspiration. Jump right in and give Forms a try – you’ve got nothing to lose (except a few piles of paper)!

 

Katherine Livick is the Professional Development Manager for Digital Learning at ESD 112 in Vancouver, WA. She develops curriculum for teacher professional development around technology and acts as a technology coach and consultant, helping teachers to integrate technology in school districts around ESD 112’s region. She has quite a number of opinions about coffee, Star Trek and plants.

 

GAFE Project-Based Learning in the Chromebook Classroom

GAFE Project-Based Learning in the Chromebook Classroom

Dani Kennis

Dani Kennis

Dani is a high school Special Education Social Studies teacher and Technology Coach in the New York suburbs. She is also a Level 2 Google Certified Trainer and co-founder of The Education Calendar, a crowdsourced map and calendar of education events worldwide. Her blended classroom incorporates the use of G Suite (formerly Google Apps for Education) as well as other Web 2.0 tools in order to prepare her students to be successful 21st century learners in a global community. She blogs about her work and teaching at DaniKennis.com and would love to connect on Twitter (@kennisdani).
Dani Kennis

GAFE Student Projects Using Chromebooks Webinar Wednesday, July 13 

Join us for a webinar with Dani Kennis Wednesday, July 13 at 1pm PDT where she will demonstrate GAFE Student Projects Using Chromebooks in greater detail. Register here: http://ctl.re/GAFE-Chromebook-Projects. Here, Dani gives us an overview of what will be covered in Wednesday’s webinar. Can’t make the live presentation? No problem. We record all our webinars and post the links on ctl.info/webinars.

By Dani Kennis

What did school look and feel like when you were a child? For me, desks were in straight rows with an overhead projector at the front of the classroom. Students vigorously scrawled down what was on the screen without reflecting, understanding or applying information. I was never asked what I wanted to learn, I was simply expected to regurgitate information I was fed. Today, advancements in ed tech, such as Chromebooks, are changing the landscape of education and shifting the roles of teachers and students. Gone are the days of teachers acting as the sage on the stage. Instead, teachers are facilitators of knowledge who provide students with opportunities to explore inquiry, passion, and creativity through content.

Project Based Learning (PBL) is an inquiry driven model that focuses on real life application of knowledge and skills to solve relevant and interesting problems. It is an engaging, motivating and enjoyable way for students and teachers to embrace the cultural shift in the education landscape. This approach is made seamless through the use of Google Apps for Education. Below are some ideas for how to get started in creating a more learner-centered classroom by using GAFE in assigning student projects.

Google Slides

  • The ‘ABCs of History’ project is the first of the school year in which students define and visually represent a term, place, person or event for each letter of the alphabet. Providing students with an index card template in Slides, they create a set of flashcards that assist in gathering information and displaying understanding of key facts in history.
  • Create Your Own Adventure: This (created by the brilliant and talented Caren MacConnell) is the best step by step guide I have seen on creating a CYOA project. The beauty of these projects is in allowing students to think outside the box and ask those ‘What If’ questions, considering alternate endings in various historical situations.   
  • Comic strip: By manipulating clip art and playing with features such as speech bubbles, animation, arrangement and order, students can design scenes of events and characters to showcase their knowledge. Some of my more ambitious students even experimented with stop animation, creating Play Dough figurines and using their phones to take pictures then create a story using Google Slides.  

Google Docs:

  • Hero/Villain Project: Provide students with both ‘Man of the Year’ template and ‘Most Wanted: Dead or Alive’ poster templates. Students then utilize notes and research to analyze and decide whether their historical figure is a hero or villain. Students often choose to ‘beef up’ and manipulate or enhance the template provided to convince the audience (which often consists of my Twitter followers) to craft a poster and provide a written justification for their choice.
  • Using one of the many available Facebook templates in Google Search (here is one example), students create a Facebook profile to showcase important information about historical or literary characters. Many of my students’ favorite parts is creating a Facebook Wall dialogue between a character and his enemy!
  • A student favorite this year was the mock interview or reenactment of an event. Students start by collaborating on Docs to script out settings and specific lines for their scenes. Many students dressed up in costume, used accents, and even scouted out relevant scenery throughout the school to establish a sense of authenticity (and theatrics, of course!). After recording on their phones, students upload their footage to Google Drive then use YouTube to edit and publish a powerful piece of content that displays their work.

Google Sites

  • In my 12th grade Social Studies class, seniors create and pitch a business idea similar to Shark Tank. This year they used Google Sites to publish a business plan, embed a YouTube video of their elevator pitch, and display their investment strategy.
  • Establishing a positive online presence in today’s digital age is crucial. Teaching students to create ePortfolios is a powerful way to teach students both how to display their best work for the world to see and also teaches them important lessons in digital citizenship.
  • Rather than writing a traditional research paper, allow students to use Sites to create a more aesthetically and visually pleasing display of their research topic. Students can create new pages for subtopics, link to supplemental information, embed video, or host a discussion board. The complexity of these tasks lends itself to student reflection in metacognition, organization, and writing skills.

Google Draw

  • Students creatively display their understanding of a topic by doing a visual brain dump. Drawings may be as complex or simplistic as a student desires, but should represent their interpretation of content material. Students can save their images and share with their teacher or upload to Google Classroom, allowing teachers to view and correct misconceptions or misunderstanding by exploring the student’s thought process.
  • Draw a timeline to provide an overview of an important time period. Students can import clip art or create their own to illustrate major events and facts.  

Google Forms

  • Students create a review quiz for one another with various types of questions – Multiple choice, written response, check boxes, etc. Using Add Ons such as Flubaroo in Google Sheets (where the results are collected) allow students to automatically gather results data and grade each other’s work quickly. This enables students (and teachers) to provide valuable and timely feedback on specific topics where misunderstandings have occurred.

Google Maps

  • Using a Google Maps class account (Maps is not included in the GAFE suite), students create a map of a specific geographic area of study. Using tags, they provide written factual information on each specific place. Best of all – This map can be embedded into a Google Site!

Google Classroom

  • While PBL is great for students, Google Classroom makes the process easy and efficient for teachers. It is invaluable in assigning, collecting, returning and grading student work in an efficient and timely manner. Additionally, it assists teachers in remaining organized and maintaining accurate records in order to best guide students to success.

A PBL approach using GAFE tools for projects requires teachers to be flexible and focused, keeping in mind that lessons should always be learning-driven, rather than tool-driven. We must remember to provide students with voice and choice in guiding them through the process of choosing the right technology tool for the task at hand. Done right, PBL creates a tangible sense of student empowerment and motivation through creativity and producing for an authentic audience. Providing our students with these experience is what truly will allow us to redefine the meaning and feel of ‘school’ for each individual student in our classes.
Dani is a high school Special Education Social Studies teacher and Technology Coach in the New York suburbs. She is also a Level 2 Google Certified Trainer and co-founder of The Education Calendar, a crowdsourced map and calendar of education events worldwide. Her blended classroom incorporates the use of Google Apps for Education as well as other Web 2.0 tools in order to prepare her students to be successful 21st century learners in a global community. She blogs about her work and teaching at DaniKennis.com and would love to connect on Twitter (@kennisdani).

Webinars at CTL

Stephanie Shea

Stephanie Shea

Marketing Manager at CTL
Stephanie Shea holds a BA in Journalism from the University of Georgia and has almost 20 years of writing experience ranging from newspaper reporting to PR, blogging, website copy, product descriptions, social media and advertising. When she’s not at CTL, Stephanie can be found playing the tenor sax, practicing astrology or hitting the running trails in Forest Park.
Stephanie Shea

We frequently have at webinars here at CTL. We find they’re a great way to connect with customers and let everyone know about our great products.  So every two weeks (if not more often) one of our sales reps hosts a webinar.

Yesterday we had a webinar on the Intel Reader, an innovative assistive technology device that takes a picture of text and read it aloud. If you weren’t able to attend yesterday’s webinar you can watch the recording of it here. Or you can join us next Wednesday for another Intel Reader webinar. You can register for that webinar here.

If have a lot of great webinars coming up including ones on the 2go Classmate PC E11 and CTL’s new All In One. To see the calendar of all upcoming CTL webianrs just click here. We hope you’ll be able to join us!