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CTL Helps Bring Digital Equity To Nevada’s Remotest Corners; Students and Schools Transformed by Successful 1:1 Program

CTL Helps Bring Digital Equity To Nevada’s Remotest Corners; Students and Schools Transformed by Successful 1:1 Program

Laura Helms

Laura Helms

Content Manager at CTL
Laura Helms holds a BA in Applied Linguistics and has been working in content and social media management for 4+ years. Native to the Pacific Northwest when she isn't in front of a computer screen you can find her teaching yoga or creating large scale mosaic murals.
Laura Helms

The Comprehensive 1:1 Solution that CTL Provided for Nevada Ready 21 (NR21) Addresses Digital Equity, from Urban Centers to even in the Remotest Corners of Rural Nevada to.

First year results from CTL’s partnership with Nevada Ready 21 (NR21) have been celebrated at the State Educational Technology Directors Association (SETDA) conference in San Antonio and the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) conference in Houston. Additionally, CTL’s J5 Convertible Chromebook was voted “ISTE 2017 Best of Show” by Tech & Learning Magazine.

Putting together a statewide 1:1 program gave CTL the economies of scale needed to bring the same comprehensive 1:1 solution to a frontier school with 19 students that it brought to middle schools with over 1,700 students.

Implementing New Tech in the Classroom is no Easy Feat

The real heroes in the success of NR21 are the administrators and teachers who have been able to quickly adapt to new technology in the classroom and assist their students through the transition. The eagerness and readiness of these educators to continually increase and refine their Chromebook knowledge is a testament to their dedication to student success and digital equity.

According to Principal Dr. Toby Melver of Eleanor Lemaire Junior High School in Battle Mountain, “This is the first time in 20 years of education in Nevada where rural schools in Nevada were on an even playing field with larger schools and districts in the country. It gave us great hope to be able to put our best foot forward and be awarded this grant based on our merits and not the size of our district.”

The innovative Nevada Ready 21 program not only provides training and access to devices, it is also succeeding in increasing access to learning, especially for diverse students in rural communities. In one middle school, the Digital Learning Coach was able to show a teacher how to use Google Translate to provide access to her lessons for a Spanish-speaking student. This process was replicated twice in the next two weeks for simplified Chinese- and Farsi-speaking students.

One of the most challenging situations that schools face is helping all students feel included in the learning community. According to Daphne DeLeon, former Nevada Ready 21 Program Director, “The ability to differentiate learning on the same device for every student allows students in special populations to feel like they are a part of the student community. At one site visit, we heard that special education students loved getting on the bus with their Chromebook because they felt just like other students.”

CTL’s History with NR-21

CTL was awarded the Nevada Ready 21 program contract in 2016. Since then, over 19,000    5th-8th graders have a Chromebook to use both in school and at home during the school year. All 23 NR21 schools also have WiFi access covering every instructional space on campus. A full report on the results shows remarkable progress.

CTL is proud to be involved in helping create a 1:1 program that reaches every student in the state of Nevada, including even the remotest areas. This ensures that all students regardless of income or proximity to urban areas have access to necessary skills for the digital age.

Contact CTL today to find out more about 1:1 solutions and how they can help your classroom or school district succeed in creating digital equity for your students.

Interactive Video Tools for Chromebooks

Interactive Video Tools for Chromebooks

Katherine Livick

Katherine Livick

Professional Development Manager for Digital Learning at ESD 112 at ESD 112
Katherine is the Professional Development Manager for Digital Learning at ESD 112. She is a Google Certified Administrator and manages ESD 112’s GAFE training domain. She’s also a Google Education Trainer who trains district personnel on best practices for managing and using Google apps in an educational setting, as well as providing general tech integration training.
Katherine Livick

Latest posts by Katherine Livick (see all)

With more Chromebook and other devices in classrooms than ever before, teachers have the opportunity to help students deepen their learning with digital tools, including video. If you’ve been using video in class, but want to be sure it’s time well spent, check out these free tools you (and your students) can use to create interactive video lessons to flip your instruction, enhance study time, and engage your class.

Bringing Video to Life

You’re probably already using video in your class, so why bother with these new tools? Video is already useful, but we can make it even more relevant to educational use with tools specifically geared toward using videos for student learning. Even a great, highly engaging video that is germane to your learning objective can be ineffective if students are zoning out when they’re supposed to be watching it. With interactive video tools, you can not only guide students’ thinking and reflection while they watch the video, you can also drop questions into the video at just the right spots to deepen their thinking or reinforce an important point. Each of these tools works slightly differently; one of them should be just right for your classroom.

[Something to consider: because they’re third-party tools, you may want to double-check with your IT department or instructional technology coach to be sure that these tools are approved for student use in your district. Many of these websites (and those of many other educational tools) collect the email address of the student when they login, which could be considered personally identifiable information. The Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act prohibits sharing of such information with third parties unless parental consent is obtained. This applies if you’re having students under 13 log in to view videos you’ve enhanced, or if you’re asking students to use the tools themselves to create quizzes or study materials. Asking students to view the videos on these websites without logging in shouldn’t create any problems, but you will not be able to collect data on student responses directly from the tool if they are not logged in.]

Interactive Video Options

Playposit: Log into this interactive video tool using OpenID–your Google, Microsoft, Clever or Edmodo account–and find the perfect video for your lesson from a number of sources, including YouTube and Vimeo. Add multiple choice or short answer questions throughout the video, then connect to Google Classroom or other tools to share your videos with students. You can view publicly shared “bulbs” (Playposit’s name for a video with questions) and use those for your class, too (though you’re limited to only a few shared bulbs as a free user). Playposit’s dashboard allows you to monitor student progress. It will let you know who’s viewed your videos and who hasn’t, but you’ll have to manually post links to the bulbs via Google Classroom, and your students will need to log in to Playposit (using their Google accounts) in order to view the videos.

EdPuzzle: This tool works in a similar way to Playposit, but allows you to upload your own videos when using a free account. You can also use YouTube or Vimeo videos, or videos from a number of different sources Like Playposit, you can use other teachers’ publicly posted lessons. Import classes from Google Classroom and post to Classroom directly from EdPuzzle using the “post to Classroom” button. You can prevent students from skipping ahead in your videos with this tool.

TED-Ed: This tool, as you might expect, was developed by the same organization that brings you TED Talks and conferences. It offers pre-made Ted-Ed lessons and series, as well as permitting you to choose YouTube videos (by searching or pasting in a URL) to create your own lessons. Ted-Ed has a very clean interface and is simple to use. It’s also 100% free, and you can choose to have students log in (if they’re over 13) or just watch the videos and take the quizzes with a nickname. Ted-Ed doesn’t collect data on the answers students submit, so it’s not as immediately useful for formative assessment as some of the other tools.

Vialogues: Another simple tool for creating interactive videos, Vialogues creates a comment stream alongside a Youtube, Vimeo, or uploaded video. Like Ted-Ed, it doesn’t collect answer data, but facilitates a discussion of issues in the video, based on questions or reflection prompts placed at certain points. As the creator of the questions and prompts, you’re a “moderator” rather than a teacher. Vialogues doesn’t connect to Google Classroom or other learning management systems, but it’s useful for non-graded activities such as encouraging reflection before an in-class discussion, or for introducing a topic.

Conclusion

Watching movies in class might have received a bad rap in years past, but with the abundance of digital video available to teachers today, we now know it can be an important part of an engaging learning unit. Try a few of these tools out with the videos you’re planning to show your class, and see how they deepen your students’ thinking. You’ve got nothing to lose!

 

To learn more about video tools for Chromebooks, attend or view Katherine’s June 15th Webinar on this subject! Register now! 

Did you know you can view all our past webinars on Chromebooks for Education and more? Find links to all our past webinars here! 

CTL Education Software Offerings

CTL Education Software Offerings

Laura Helms

Laura Helms

Content Manager at CTL
Laura Helms holds a BA in Applied Linguistics and has been working in content and social media management for 4+ years. Native to the Pacific Northwest when she isn't in front of a computer screen you can find her teaching yoga or creating large scale mosaic murals.
Laura Helms

Did you know that CTL offers a variety of educational cloud-based web apps that are made for educational Chromebook use? Whether you’re looking to secure your Chromebooks for student safety or seeking to enhance the classroom environment with interactive learning programs, CTL has what you need.

Our software vendor partners have been vetted and proven to be outstandingly successful in their fields of operation. Here is a list of some of our offerings:

Google for Education Apps for Chromebooks:

Did you know that CTL is a Google for Education Premier Partner? Google has become a front-runner in the education sector offering many cloud-based apps specifically designed for use in schools and classrooms.

  • Google Chrome Management Console makes it easy for school IT administrators to deploy and manage users, devices and apps across a fleet of thousands of Chromebooks.
  • G Suite for Education allows teachers and students to create, share and edit files in real time. G Suite for Education core services include Gmail, Calendar, Docs, Sheets, Slides, Hangouts and Drive.
  • Google Classroom  is a new tool in G Suite for Education that helps teachers create and organise assignments quickly, provide feedback efficiently and communicate easily with their classes.

Internet Accessibility and Safety Apps for Chromebooks:

CTL understands that your all your students need access to the internet to be successful and in order to maintaining CIPA compliance and safe browsing environments for students is priority number one. That is why we offer several great cloud-based software options for security.

  • Kajeet is an industry leader for closing the digital equity gap on providing safe mobile internet connectivity for students. Their Education Broadband solution includes their Kajeet SmartSpot device and cloud portal which allows school districts to provide CIPA-Compliant, education-only filtered internet access at home.
  • Securly is a first of it’s kind cloud-based web filtering software, Securly, gives administrators and educators the ability to customize student’s online browsing experiences and monitor emails and social media to curb cyber bullying and self-harm.
  • GoGuardian provides administrators the power of web filtering, protection, analytics, and reporting all in one place. For teachers, GoGaurdian allows you to set browsing restrictions and view the screens of each students, ensuring that teachers can focus on teaching and not monitoring student device behavior.
  • NetOp Vision allows teachers to manage exactly what students are seeing on their Chromebooks during instruction, block access to the web, and direct attention to the teacher with screen customizable lock screens.

STEM – Math, Science, Coding, etc. Apps for Chromebooks

Your students learn better when they are engaged through a variety of learning methods combined with discovery and play.

  • LabCam helps to promote scientific inquiry, helps make abstract concepts tangible for students and is an excellent complement to your STEM curriculum.The application includes six modules: Time-Lapse Camera, Microscope, Pathfinder, Universal Logger, Kinematics, and Motion Cam.
  • Desmos Graphing Calculator is a best-in-class HTML5 graphing calculator that allows millions of students free access via their internet browser. With a mission to help all students learn and love learning math, their digital tools allow for teachers to create activities or use the Desmos activities provided on the site.
  • CodeCombat is an interactive learning game that combines learning and fun. Students are led through an interactive universe where special game play powers are utilized by creating read code!
  • NCLabs has created a variety of programs with the goal of bringing educational equity to STEM education programs everywhere. These online courses teach students a variety computational thinking and programming skills using fun games that make learning feel like play.
  • PocketLab is a science lab that fits in your pocket and connects to software ran on Chromebook. This little device can be used to measure position, velocity, acceleration, magnetic fields, pressure, altitude, and temperature. When connected to the PocketLab software, students are able to see detailed reporting on experiments.  
  • Intel Tools bring an innovative and engaging approach to science, reading, debate, and more. These specialized tools allow for students to map out cause and effect relationships and learn processes for data collection. Each of the Intel Tools Apps gives teachers the tools they need to create lesson plans and project ideas, and students the platform to

Educational Music Apps for Chromebooks:

Music has been proven to aid in developing language and reasoning. Our music software offerings allow students to learn the basics of music in a collaborative, fun, and creative environment.

  • Noteflight allows students to write, create, and share music online using the Noteflight composing software. Students will gain knowledge of keys, scales, tempos, and familiarize themselves with a variety of instruments.

Video & Image Editing Apps for Chromebooks:

Our world is becoming increasingly based in multimedia formats. Our video and image editing software offerings take Chromebooks for education to the next level teaching students how to produce brilliant videos and presentations.

  • WeVideo is a unique cloud-based collaborative video editing service that helps people from all over the world simply create and share great-looking videos. The WeVideo editor is easy enough for first-time editors, and sophisticated enough to help students create a professional-looking video.
  • Autodesk Pixlr allows students to edit images by quickly cropping, rotating, and fine-tune any picture. The cloud-based app is easy-to-use and allows students to turn photos into works of art with great effects like crosshatch, halftone, and dapple with a single-click.

Contact CTL today to find out more about these Chromebook applications and how you can use implement them in your schools and classrooms!

Managing Chromebooks in the Classroom

Managing Chromebooks in the Classroom

Katherine Livick

Katherine Livick

Professional Development Manager for Digital Learning at ESD 112 at ESD 112
Katherine is the Professional Development Manager for Digital Learning at ESD 112. She is a Google Certified Administrator and manages ESD 112’s GAFE training domain. She’s also a Google Education Trainer who trains district personnel on best practices for managing and using Google apps in an educational setting, as well as providing general tech integration training.
Katherine Livick

Latest posts by Katherine Livick (see all)

So–you’re getting Chromebooks for your classroom! This is a great opportunity for you and your students. You’ve heard they’re great tools…but the thought of all the things that could go wrong makes your blood run cold. What’s an already-busy teacher to do with the influx of technology into his or her classroom? Every situation is different, but there are a few things you can consider to make the transition smooth for everyone.

Introducing Chromebooks

What is a Chromebook, anyway? How is it different from a laptop? It’s a good idea to have a background understanding of what you’re actually wrangling in your classroom. A Chromebook is essentially a netbook, or small lightweight laptop, that runs the Chrome OS operating system instead of MacOS or Windows. Don’t worry – the environment won’t look too foreign to you once you’re used to it. In order to be called a Chromebook, a laptop must meet certain standards set forth by Google that allow it to operate comfortably with Google tools. Chromebooks are designed to work smoothly with Google apps, but you can run almost any web-based application on a Chromebook, including Office 365. There are a few exceptions, but that list is shrinking by the day. Chromebooks do have some storage space, but they aren’t designed to hold all your documents and data–that’s what Google Drive is for.

Most of the time, when you use a Chromebook, you will log in with your own Google (school district) email account. This is also likely to be how your students will use the Chromebooks. The documents you create and work on will be stored in your Google Drive, which means you can log in to that same account from any device and find all your stuff. This is why your students don’t need to grab the same Chromebook every time (though some teachers prefer that they do just to keep track of how the device is being treated). Pretty cool!

Daily Routines

Think through your daily routines and storage of the devices. Depending on the number of Chromebooks you have, and on district policy, you’ll want to think about the following things:

  • Do students take the devices home? Are they responsible for arriving at school with a fully charged device? Does your district designate policies around handling of electronics, or do you need to make your own?
  • How do students know if they need a device today/this period/for this lesson? It’s a good idea to have a system or sign so you don’t have to answer the question “Can I get out my Chromebook?” a million times at the beginning of the day. Frisco ISD made some great resources for device handling and signals for use–their site is aimed at students who are bringing their own devices to school, but the resources are handy for anyone with devices in their classroom. Take a look at some great teacher advice and student-created posters.
  • If Chromebooks are stored in the classroom, how and where? What are the likely problems with traffic patterns to and from the storage area? Does everyone fetch his or her own device, or will you designate helpers who will pass them out?
  • It’s advisable to be very specific when teaching students how to handle a Chromebook, as well. Two hands on the device whenever you’re carrying it is a very good idea. Be sure to model this behavior for students…I admit that I have dropped a Chromebook in front of my class more than once!
  • Computers collect germs (yuck). Make sure you set policies around food and beverage use near the devices. Whose responsibility is it to clean the devices? How often? Is your district providing cleaning materials that are legal and safe for school use? (Please don’t Windex your Chromebook!)

Expectations and Consequences

If you haven’t used computers in your classroom much, you’ll need to adjust your classroom management style just a bit. Don’t worry too much, and don’t think of yourself as the Internet police, but it’s a good idea to be sure you’re moving about the room. Before you ask students to get their devices, be sure you have a clear purpose for their use, and clearly communicate that to students (with intermittent reminders). If your principal walks in and asks a student “What are you doing with that Chromebook”, you want them to be able to answer intelligently! To save yourself major headaches later, decide on some attention signals to use (yes, even with older students) so you aren’t doing an interpretive dance up front to get attention from a class full of students with eyes glued to screens. Some teachers say “Screens 45” to indicate that they need to interrupt student work briefly; then say “Screens closed” to indicate that they need students to turn off the devices. Be sure to give adequate time for students to respond–even adults don’t respond instantly!

Once you’ve set expectations for device use in your classroom, you’ll need to decide on consequences for misuse as well. Your district may have a policy that you’ll need to follow, or you can create your own. Make sure it allows for a learning curve and an occasional mistake (nobody’s perfect), and then be consistent and fair in enforcing it. It’s always a good idea to know how you would teach a lesson without the technology, just in case something goes wrong (behaviorally or with the network!)

After reviewing basic procedures and expectations with students, it’s a great idea to involve them in the management of their classroom by having them create presentations or posters as reminders for the whole class.

Don’t Panic–Plan!

You have a great opportunity to deepen your teaching when you have Chromebooks available in your classroom. With a little advance organization, you can have a great experience with these devices–and your students will learn some valuable new skills!

Want to learn more?

Register for the May 17th Webinar on this same topic with Katherine Livick at http://ctl.info/webinars/

You can also view all our past webinars at http://ctl.info/webinars/ or on the CTL YouTube Channel 

CTL’s J2 Chromebook 15-Pack Offers an Affordable Alternative to Apple’s Bulk Offer

CTL’s J2 Chromebook 15-Pack Offers an Affordable Alternative to Apple’s Bulk Offer

Laura Helms

Laura Helms

Content Manager at CTL
Laura Helms holds a BA in Applied Linguistics and has been working in content and social media management for 4+ years. Native to the Pacific Northwest when she isn't in front of a computer screen you can find her teaching yoga or creating large scale mosaic murals.
Laura Helms

CTL is offering a special deal that provides 50 percent more product for less money. The 15-pack bulk option for its J2 Chromebooks is set at a reasonable price, which is competitive to Apple’s bulk iPad Mini offer.

Chromebooks for Education Makes Sense and Saves Cents!

Complete with Chrome Device Management Licenses and free shipping, CTL’s $2,400 price point is less expensive than Apple.The offer is simple. Purchasers buy one bulk box, within is 15 Chromebooks bundled with Google Chrome Management Console licenses.  

Chromebooks are the #1 selling device in US schools, outselling Apple products in the education market because they are versatile, affordable, and easy to manage. In addition, Chromebooks are designed to work with Google’s G Suite for Education, a suite of free productivity tools including Google Classroom. Chromebooks and the vast ecosystem of apps and content they support, foster a collaborative experience in and out of the classroom for teachers and students.

J2 Chromebooks are Tailor Made for Classrooms!

Unlike the iPad Mini, Apple’s current offering to the education sector, the J2 Chromebook is specialized for fast and easy school deployments with:

  • cloud-based file storage options,
  • built-in webcam, microphone, and speakers,
  • a built-in water-resistant keyboard,
  • powerful processor,
  • rugged design,
  • and up to 10 Hours of battery life.

In a recent review of the CTL J2 Chromebook, PC Magazine stated that it is the “best education-focused Chromebook we’ve seen.”

CTL’s J2 Chromebook is backed by a one year warranty and CTL’s enterprise level service and support. Each order ships all together in a CTL eco-friendly reusable bulk pack, reducing waste and saving IT departments time and money by streamlining deployment.

 

Act now to take advantage of this special offer!

Student-Proof Chromebooks for Education

Student-Proof Chromebooks for Education

Laura Helms

Laura Helms

Content Manager at CTL
Laura Helms holds a BA in Applied Linguistics and has been working in content and social media management for 4+ years. Native to the Pacific Northwest when she isn't in front of a computer screen you can find her teaching yoga or creating large scale mosaic murals.
Laura Helms

Accidents happen, and we’ve all gone through those awkward childhood years which all but guarantee that if there is something to spill, it will spill; if there is something to drop, it will drop; and if there’s something to break, it will break. CTL understands this and has worked hard to create an ultra-rugged, student-proof Chromebook designed to stand up to spills, drops, and accidents.

Spill Proof Keyboards: No More Crying Over Spilled Milk on Your Chromebooks

Your students have a lot on their plates and hopefully they aren’t using their chromebooks as one. But in the event that liquids are spilled on the keyboard, CTL’s Chromebooks can handle that. Each CTL Chromebook for Education has a built-in membrane around the keyboard and touchpad that allows up to 11 oz. of liquid to be channeled away from important electronics. That’s almost a whole bottle of water! If a spill occurs, all the user needs to do is tip the Chromebook up and allow the water to drain off before wiping down.

Drop Resistant Design Helps Protect CTL Chromebooks

2.3 feet is about the average distance from desk to floor, hand to ground, and “whoops” to “crash”. Luckily, CTL Chromebooks have been drop tested to withstand a fall of this distance. Their sturdy design features a stronger, thicker rear cover frame around the screen, sides, and edges which helps absorb and reduces the risk of damage when dropped.

CTL’s J Series Chromebooks for education feature a textured cover which diminishes the appearance of scratches and dings and makes it easier to grip. The CTL NL61 Series Chromebooks come with a durable carrying handle. And all of CTL’s Chromebooks for Education can be purchased with CTL’s X-Protect (patent pending) cover, which can withstand pressure and heavy weight on top, reducing breaks by up to 90%.

Watch the video below to see a Do Not Try This at Home demonstration from our CTL Spain team!

There’s a Warranty for That

If your students do manage to break their Chromebooks, CTL has a free 1-year warranty on accidental damage to the J5 series and an affordable build-your-own warranty for all other CTL products. CTL also offers a variety of replacement parts to allow your IT teams to make onsite repairs. The majority of CTL replacement parts are housed in our Portland office, meaning you’ll receive your orders as quickly as possible.

Learn more about CTL Chromebooks for Education and current specials. Go to: http://ctl.net/education